My Blog Posts

My November 2018 Open-Source Contributions

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Continuing my new blog series, here’s my open-source contributions for this past month:

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My November 2018 Linux Snap Package Metrics

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I maintain a few Snap packages (installable Linux software packages) and I’ve been very interested in the metrics that Snapcraft (the Snap Store) provides. It’s a (minor) indicator of how large the snap user base is (or at least growth) as well as how useful a snap may or may not be. In October I started this Linux Snap Package Metrics series and I’ll be updating every month with the numbers until someone tells me otherwise 😄.

Here’s the metrics for snaps I maintain for the past month:

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I Made a Pocket Casts Desktop App for Linux

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I’m a long-time Pocket Casts user. Not only do I love the Android app (it’s one of the few I pay for), I use to love listening to Russell Ivanovic, the creator of Pocket Casts, talk about it on the Material podcast.

It’s everywhere - my Android phone, Android tablet, Google Cast, and even in my car with Android Auto. Well, almost everywhere. As most companies do, they neglected to make a desktop app for Linux (they recently made one for Windows).

I decided to whip something up.

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What Are Linux Snap Packages? Why Use Them?

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I’m been using Snap packages to install software on my laptop more and more. They’re extremely useful and more people should be using them though not everyone understands them yet. Here’s a quick post on what they are and why you’d want to use them.

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U.S. Military Slack Emojis

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Yesterday was the official Veteran’s Day Holiday in the United States and today is Veteran’s Day (Observed). I wanted to give a shout out to my fellow veteran colleagues at CircleCI in our Slack Team and realized there wasn’t any custom Slack emojis for the U.S. branches of military. So I created some.

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I Made a Hugo Chrome Extension

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I made a very simple Google Chrome Extension for people who build websites with the Hugo static site generator (SSG) and launched it on Product Hunt. This first release has two main features: The extension icon “lights up” whenever you’re browsing a Hugo-built website. You can search the Hugo documentation from Chrome’s Omnibox (address bar). Install You can view and install the Chrome extension via the Chrome Web Store. continue reading →

Upgrading the Ubuntu Server Kernel

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If you run an Ubuntu-based server (as most of the world does) you should know that keeping the server up-to-date is important for security and stability. Occasionally certain kernel updates will come through that won’t get installed. Instead, you’ll see this message:

The following packages have been kept back: linux-generic linux-headers-generic linux-image-generic

Here’s how to install these updates safely.

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Get Emailed When an Ubuntu Server Needs a Reboot

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When your Ubuntu server needs to be rebooted, say after a kernel update, the file /var/run/reboot-required is created. You can check for that file to see if a reboot is needed and usually you’ll get a message upon logging into the server saying so. Here’s how you can get an email when a reboot is needed saving you the time of manually checking.

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My October 2018 Linux Snap Package Metrics

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I maintain a few Snap packages (installable Linux software packages) and I’ve been very interested in the metrics that Snapcraft (the Snap Store) provides. it’s a (minor) indicator of how large the snap userbase is (or at least growth) as well as how useful a snap may or may not be. So here’s the beginning of what may be a new monthly series on my blog.

Here’s the metrics for snaps I maintain for the past month:

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Would a Nonprofit Twitter Clone Work?

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Many people have said that Facebook has gotten so big it should be considered a public utility. I think this applies much more so to Twitter given the penetration and speed a single tweet can achieve for both local and global news. Forget major cities and tech hubs, even the most remote parts of the world get their news via tweets.

This utility-like nature has been threatened and damaged many times before by decisions Twitter has made. Some of these decisions due to what’s in their best interest as a for-profit business. They have an obligation to make money, I understand.

But what if they didn’t?

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