My Blog Posts

CircleCI Configuration Visualization

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I’ve heard from some people that they don’t quite understand the relationship between CircleCI concepts like pipelines, workflows, jobs, and steps. The first of which is brand new to CircleCI. Here’s a visualization (or diagram) of these CircleCI concepts and how they fit together.

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How the U.S. Military Is Structured [Diagram]

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The newly created U.S. Space Force has been popping up in the news regularly. Most recently the U.S. Air Force revealed the seal of the U.S. Space Force. Whether you think the Space Force is a good idea or not, it’s now a reality and I’m pretty sure not everyone knows where it fits in the military. Especially since to this day most people still don’t understand how the Marines fit into the structure either.

So, I’ve created a quick diagram of the U.S. Military structure and how each organization relates to each other. Hopefully someone finds it useful.

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This Navy Veteran Created The Reserve Force - an online resource for reservists

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I spent 6+ years serving in the United States Navy. As a reservist I had the opportunity to witness the many pros and cons of the Navy Reserves, particularly when it comes to modern technology. Simply put, the resources and websites provided to reservists are lacking. I’m taking my 10+ years of experience in the tech industry to solve the problem from outside the Navy. Today my Navy shipmate and I launch The Reserve Force.

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Quick Tip: Create a CircleCI Baseline Build on New Branches

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Over the years I’ve developed a little habit when working on projects tested via CircleCI. I push the git branch to GitHub… without any changes. It’s simple, weird, but works. Here’s what I mean.

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My December 2019 Linux Snap Package Metrics

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I maintain a few Snap packages (installable Linux software packages) and I’ve been very interested in the metrics that Snapcraft (the Snap Store) provides. It’s a (minor) indicator of how large the snap user base is (or at least growth) as well as how useful a snap may or may not be. In October of 2018 I started this Linux Snap Package Metrics series and I’m trying to report back every month with the numbers until someone tells me otherwise 😄.

Here’s the metrics for snaps I maintain for the past month:

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Linode Ascii Art Desktop Wallpaper

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Here’s a terminal, ascii art themed Linode 4k wallpaper.

Enjoy.

You’ll find the preview in this post but you can download the full resolution 4K/16:9 version (for normal screens) and a nearly-4K/16:10 version (for Macbook-like screens) from the links below.

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CircleCI Desktop Wallpaper #8

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In continuing with my series of CircleCI desktop wallpapers, here’s another one.

You’ll find the preview in this post but you can download the full resolution 4K/16:9 version (for normal screens) and a nearly-4K/16:10 version (for Macbook-like screens) from the links below.

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GroupBy For Data Files in Hugo

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I recently had the need to list out a bunch of locations on a page with Hugo. With over 100 locations to display, I wanted to group them by state on the page creating a kind of directory. The first thing that came to mind was Hugo’s GroupBy function.

Unfortunately I’ve learned that the GroupBy function only works on Hugo Pages while I’m storing all of these locations in a Hugo Data File. Here’s how I solved this problem.

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6 Common CircleCI Gotchas & Myths

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CircleCI is by far the best Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD) platform out there for most people. While I do work for CircleCI, I truly believe this. That being said, there’s a few things that tend to trip up new users (and sometimes veteran users as well).

Here’s a few CircleCI gotchas and myths that I tend to see with new users or complicated CI builds.

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My October 2019 Linux Snap Package Metrics

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I maintain a few Snap packages (installable Linux software packages) and I’ve been very interested in the metrics that Snapcraft (the Snap Store) provides. It’s a (minor) indicator of how large the snap user base is (or at least growth) as well as how useful a snap may or may not be. In October of 2018 I started this Linux Snap Package Metrics series and I’m trying to report back every month with the numbers until someone tells me otherwise 😄.

Here’s the metrics for snaps I maintain for the past month:

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